Hmm. I’m annoyed that newspapers consider it unprintably offensive (especially …

Comment on Is it offensive? The Ardorous X American Apparel Period Power Washed Tee (Images NSFW) by Jaynie.

Hmm. I’m annoyed that newspapers consider it unprintably offensive (especially given some of the things they DO print!), but I suspect that the only people who would want to wear it would be TRYING to cause offense. Difficult to know which side to fall on, really.

I think we’re altogether too prudish in a lot of ways, but I don’t know that “shock value” is a very good counter to that. It almost reinforces the shock, rather than promoting reflection or change.n

Recent Comments by Jaynie

Six Quirky Clutch Bags
I do think the book one is pretty cute. However, Googling “DIY book clutch” turns up quite a few results, so I’d probably attempt to flex my creative muscles long before I considered opening my wallet.

The Lulu Guiness one and the nautical one I’d admire on someone else (the nautical one is particularly Fashion Police, I think!), but probably not want for myself for personal style reasons. The others are a tiny bit too cutesy for my taste…


Fifty Fashion Fails (According to a new survey)
Yeah, I was going to say that in my part of the Internet, “Fedora” is synonymous with “Thinks the silly emotional wimmin should make him a sandwich, lolz” Nice Guys. I can see how that would be a baffling inclusion on the list if you don’t encounter that attitude much though. (And I don’t suppose a woman wearing a fedora would be conveying the same message…)

As for some of the other things on the list — it looks like the results of asking a bunch of people who are vaguely aware of fashion, but don’t really care about it too much. There are a lot of things that are really obvious targets of loathing, or really dated, or both. The capris thing is therefore probably a holdover from an earlier time — I remember them being considered quite mumsy a decade or so ago (at least in Canada). If they polled the same number of people, but gleaned them from fashion blog readerships, they’d probably get more replies like “birkenstocks with fancy dresses!” etc.


Style Trial | White cleated sole shoes
They look like the shoes I imagine Baby Spice will wear when she’s ninety.

The idea that it is “edgy” and “unconventional” to wear the same clunky shoes everyone else is wearing cracks me up. You’re* just so unconventional and wacky that you decided white cleated platforms were “in” at this particular moment, and it’s just some weird fashion zeitgeist that led all of the other fashionistas to have the same idea? OK. Sure.

*General you.


Do larger mannequins make you feel better about your figure?
I think if there is any effect (would like to see some research on it), it’s likely to be subtle. There are studies where average women who have looked at photos of “desirable” (for example, dressed and posed in an alluring way) larger women feel more confident than those who have looked at pictures of similarly posed thin women. But they don’t tend to make a connection between the confidence boost and the photos, and would probably say the pictures didn’t affect them if asked. It’s a really subconscious thing.

That said, if we have to have a one-size-fits-all mannequin, it makes sense to me that it should be the average size. It’s not representative, but it’s more representative than what we’ve already got. Ideally, it would be great to see a variety of shapes and sizes of mannequins, which would allow retailers greater flexibility in dressing them too, but I’m not sure how economically feasible that is.


You’ll be happiest with your style when you’re 33, survey says
Oddly enough, according to the latest data 24 is around the age when your brain (more or less) finishes with the changes that have been going on since adolescence (I am grossly oversimplifying that, but it’s the gist). And 24 is when a lot of people start proper careers, or families, or both. I’d bet it being fashion-crisis central has a lot to do with being on the cusp of “adulthood”, psychologically speaking; all the clothing you used to look and feel comfortable in suddenly seems juvenile, but you don’t really know where to being when it comes to shopping for grown-up clothes that are still true to your style. By 33 I imagine you’ve got the hang of it.

And I say this as a 24 year old who, yes, feels a bit of despair looking at her closet sometimes. There is, of course, the added horror that most of us don’t have enough money to make significant changes to our wardrobes, so we have to live with things we no longer like, sometimes for a very long time indeed.

Older adults might start to feel less comfortable and confident as they age out of beauty norms (and, eventually, have to change their wardrobes again to grandma clothing!), but then older adults tend to be a lot more confident and comfortable than people in their 20s so it’s probably not as extreme a transition.


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