Pippa Middleton shouldn’t wear green to a wedding, says Daily Mail. (Or high heels.)

Pippa Middleton wears green dress to a wedding

This weekend poor Pippa Middleton was forced to relinquish her Daily Mail Girl of the Moment crown, when she managed to rile the tabloid by committing the cardinal sin of wearing green to a wedding: an act, which, the Fail points out, is “traditionally associated with bad luck”.

The Mail have charged Pippa with, not one, but TWO crimes of fashion:

1. Wearing green to a wedding: outlawed as described above

2. Wearing high heels to the same wedding. According to the Mail, “the aristocratic set consider heels unsightly at weddings. Only kitten-heeled shoes are deemed acceptable in the country.”

Our eyes are rolling so much right now they’re in danger of dropping right out of our heads.

To address the first point: we thought we’d heard all of the “bad luck” stories associated with colours and weddings, but “never wear green” somehow managed to pass us by. A quick Google search reveals that brides be crazy, there are all kinds of superstitions associated with weddings – so much so that we’re now REALLY glad we’re not superstitious, because it must be exhausting going through life like that, seriously. On the subject of wearing green, however, we learned that it’s considered bad luck for the BRIDE to wear green, unless it’s an Irish wedding, in which case it’s OK for the bride to wear green, but bad luck for anyone else to wear green. Are you following this? Some people, however, also believe it’s bad luck for ANYONE to wear green at a wedding, although opinions differ on whether it’s the newly wedded couple who will be cursed, or the person wearing the green. Or perhaps just passers-by, or the vicar’s cat, or something. Seriously, our brief journey into the world of weddings and superstitions has left our heads spinning, and NOTHING would surprise us now. NOTHING.

(The Chief of Police would just like to take a quick moment here to apologise to all of the couples whose marriages are now doomed because she wore green to their weddings. She is sorry. She is also now wearing a tinfoil helmet and living inside a special padded room, just in case it’s HERSELF she’s doomed in this way. Fashion: so much more dangerous and complicated than you might think!)

Anyway, our point here: we think Pippa’s probably fine. Unless it was the wedding of a particularly superstitious couple, we doubt they’re seriously upset by this so-called “faux pas”, so we’re not going to bother arresting Pippa for committing it. Whew!

On the “high heels are unsightly” thing: meh. Whatevs. We’re most definitely not aristocrats, so we have no idea whether they do, indeed, have a “only wear kitten heels in the country, dahlink,” rule, but we’ve never really considered kitten heels to be “sightly” anywhere, so we’re happy to completely ignore this one, too. (OK, we guess if you were “in the country” in the sense of “wading through fields”, then you won’t want to be wearing heels. But given that this is a wedding, we feel safe in assuming that it didn’t take place in a farmer’s field, and no heels were damaged.)

What do you think, though, jurors? Have you heard of the “never wear green to a wedding” rule? Would you obey it, if you have? What about high heels in the country? Fashion faux pas, or yet another ridiculous fashion rule which was made to be broken?

24 Comments

  • September 20, 2011

    Elizabeth@rosalilium

    Yep, I have always assumed it was a ‘known’ fact that you cannot wear green to a wedding. It’s a little outdated I guess, and most people aren’t that superstitious, but I probably wouldn’t wear green, just in case.

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  • September 20, 2011

    cora

    green is my favorite color. i’m getting married in two weeks, and ALL of my bridesmaids are wearing lovely green dresses. i’ve even asked to buy one of them from the bridesmaid closest to my size, post-ceremony, because i love these dresses so much. superstition, schmuperstition.

    and yes, as a fellow redhead, i have a disproportionately large number of green dresses in my closet, many of which have been worn to weddings. so far, all of my friend’s new marriages seem to be doing just fine…

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    • September 20, 2011

      The Fashion Police

      I woudln’t worry too much… My parents also had their bridesmaids in green dresses and it’s their Ruby Wedding anniversary next month 🙂

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  • September 20, 2011

    Cookie

    This one is quite interesting to me, because I am attending a wedding this weekend, and the dress my seamstress is currently making is, in fact, a green dress. And the wedding is also in the country, and I planned on wearing heels. What horror! 😉
    As far as I was informed, however, it was only inappropriate to wear white or sombre black outfits, and possibly, red. This is the first time I heard of green being bad luck.
    Isn’t green traditionally associated with spring and growth and such? Shouldn’t that make it, in fact, a lucky colour to wear?

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    • September 21, 2011

      Amee

      I think it has something to do with it being the fairie’s colour, and they will curse your wedding, or something. I’ve heard of it, but only in a L.M Montgomery novel. I believe it was Marigold.

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      • September 21, 2011

        Nell

        Being as I’m choosing green as the accent colour for my wedding I took this quite seriously (for a second, anyway) and did a bit of research – the the line this refers to ‘married in green, ashamed to be seen’ is supposed to mean that the bride had been rolling in the grass prior to the wedding, so is ‘ashamed to be seen’ – presumably because she’s been getting her end away before being married… If the Daily Fail want to get all hot under the collar about that sort of thing, then really they should look at what century we’re in!!!!

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  • September 20, 2011

    Nell

    Crikey – I’m planning on using green as the accent colour for my own wedding – it’s my favourite colour, and it’s MY wedding – so tell that to the Daily Fail!

    In fact the sort of green I will be using is the same shade as Pippa’s dress – so there you go…

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  • September 20, 2011

    Catherine

    I have never heard of the green rule. For godsakes my sister-in-law’s bridesmaid dresses were that exact color. I have definitely heard of the no-white/ivory rule, though I wonder if Kate’s choice of bridesmaid color will start to change that. The green rule seriously sounds about as dumb to me as the no-white-after-Labor-Day rule.

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  • September 20, 2011

    naiadknight

    “Married in green, ashamed to be seen.” I don’t see how that little verse applies to everyone else at the wedding party, but then again, I wore emerald green velvet to my own wedding, so it’s obvious how much of a rat’s hindquarters I give for superstition.

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  • September 20, 2011

    SparklingSam

    Well I never wear green anyway, cos I look awful in green. So that means I’m good luck then?

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  • September 20, 2011

    Jeannine

    I’m Scots-Irish, so I was planning to get married in green if I ever get married. I think most of the superstitions about wedding colors started around the time of Queen Victoria, and have slowly faded away for most of the population (at least in the U.S.A.) I don’t see anything wrong with it.

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  • September 20, 2011

    Itzel

    I’ll be a bridesmaid in December and the bride chose green dresses, I had never heard of that rule oh well.

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  • September 20, 2011

    Siel

    I’d never heard of that rule before! I thought the only rule was to not wear white on a wedding?

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  • September 20, 2011

    Marianne S.

    Is PIppa suddenly an aristocrat because her sister married in? She looks lovely from what I can see of the dress, so the paper must be looking for something rag over. Surely her love-life makes better gossip than this? Poor girl…

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  • September 20, 2011

    Roisin

    The Daily Mail can still shove it. Unless the bride is unhappy with green, and has said so, this ruling is ass.

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    • September 21, 2011

      The Fashion Police

      Unless the bride is unhappy with green, and has said so, this ruling is ass.

      I think the part of your comment I’ve bolded is really important in all of this… Obviously there are some things that go without saying (Don’t dress like a bride, don’t turn up in sweatpants, etc) but when you start to get into the realms of ancient superstition, I really think the couple getting married should take it upon themselves to let people know if they’re taking it super-seriously, and are going to be upset by a guest’s choice of colour. I think the fact that so many people here hadn’t heard of this one is a pretty good sign that it’s not THAT well known: it would honestly never have occurred to me to think green would be a no-no, so I was a bit horrified to realise I’d been committing this terrible “faux pas”, although, that said, I don’t think my friends were offended by it!

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      • August 22, 2012

        Passerby

        Seconded. Honestly, beyond the well-known “don’t wear white, don’t look like you’re going to a funeral” rules I don’t think guests should be expected to know any of these weird little superstitions. I think they’re pretty cool myself, but it’s like those black-and-white wedding that are so popular – if you want all of your guests to wear one color head to toe, you need to call them up and talk to them individually. And be prepared for a few to completely space out/ignore you and turn up in kelly green.

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  • September 21, 2011

    Lulu

    Traditionally, green is a symbol of life and new growth.
    Evergreen symbolizes constancy and perpetual love.
    That makes green a perfect choice for a wedding in my book.
    (You will find that green was a common choice for wedding gowns in the High Middle Ages and Renaissance.)

    As for the kitten heels, I love kittens and I love heels, but I HATE kitten heels.
    If someone insists on getting hitched in a cornfield, I’m wearing boots!

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  • September 21, 2011

    Anna

    Wtf?? I’ve never heard either of these rules. I’m pretty sure I’ve worn green to plenty of weddings and all of the marriages have turned out just fine. If everyone followed all of the random superstitions around dressing for a wedding, people would be going to weddings naked.

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  • September 21, 2011

    Janeth

    This article is both ridiculous ad hilarious, as well as the comments.
    I think that the only way you shouldn’t wear green t a weddig is if the bride says NO GREEN, or if she is wearing green

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  • September 24, 2011

    Zoe

    Uh oh, I better warn my sister. She was planning on having the bridesmaids wear green for her wedding next August. As a bridesmaid, I should worry because either her marriage is cursed and I shall be to blame or I shall be cursed.

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  • September 24, 2011

    Skolaidhe

    ‘GREEN AND WHITE, FORSAKEN QUITE.’

    I am not superstitious, but it does not surprise me that the royal family would be held to older standards. Monarchies are always held to longstanding traditions. They aren’t even allowed to bare the skin on their legs, remember? The rest of us dropped that little morsel a loooooong while ago.

    And then, the rest of us mere mortals still hold with the tradition of ‘something old / something new / something borrowed / something blue’, even if we forget the ‘silver sixpence in her shoe’. It’s not as though these things are forgotten, though forsaken.

    Green has long been associated, in the vernacular, with being unripe and unready. If a person is ‘green’, they are naive and unsophisticated. The word ‘greenhorn’ encompasses this association nicely. As recently as the early 20th century — before the universal establishment of the White Wedding Dress in the ’30s — brides were warned about the associations of different colors:

    ‘MARRIED IN WHITE, YOU HAVE CHOSEN ALRIGHT;
    MARRIED IN RED, YOU’LL WISH YOURSELF DEAD;
    MARRIED IN GREEN, ASHAMED TO BE SEEN;
    MARRIED IN YELLOW, ASHAMED OF THE FELLOW;
    MARRIED IN BLUE, YOU’LL ALWAYS BE TRUE.’

    However, the color green is further associated with envy. It is in this sense an ‘ugly’ color to wear to a wedding, for ANY person, as it would suggest a reluctance on the part of the guest for the newlyweds to be together.

    Finally, in Ireland and in the Scottish lowlands, the color is associated with fairies and other sprites. It is considered a magnet for mischief. This was not mere flippancy on the part of etiquette books. At one point, EVEN GREEN FOODS WERE AVOIDED. The Irish have only began to use green in their ceremonies over the past few decades, and that was probably influenced by the large number of Irish AMERICANS who were coming to Ireland to be married in green ceremonies.

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  • August 17, 2012

    Jane

    So, I wore emerald when I was the bridesmaid at my cousins wedding, because all the girls in my family are very pale and have dark brown/red hair. Um… she’s cool. They’re doing fine. None of us bridesmaids have disintegrated or spontaneously melted when a girl from Kansas dumped a bucket of water on us so…

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    • August 17, 2012

      Jane

      (Not that girls from Kansas dump water on me often. That would be terribly inconvenient.)

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