REAL vs STEAL | Mint lace dresses by Dolce & Gabbana and RoseGal

Docle & Gabbana mint dress

L-R: Dresses by Dolce & Gabbana and RoseGal

Today’s edition of “Real Vs Steal” features a very literal interpretation of that phrase: the lower-priced dress isn’t simply “inspired by” its designer counterpart – it’s such an exact copy of it that it could be said to be literally “stealing” the designer style.

The designer dress in question is this mint beauty by Dolce & Gabbana. Our sister site ShoeperWoman featured this dress earlier this week, and we instantly fell in love with it. As it costs a bank-breaking £1,885, however, we resigned ourself to the fact that we’d never get to wear anything remotely like it – until Fashion Police informer, Claudia, emailed us the link to the RoseGal copy, which is a whole lot cheaper at $32.09.

What can we tell you about RoseGal? Well, not a whole lot, as it happens. We’ve never shopped from the site ourselves, but we’ve been aware of it for a while now. It’s one of a growing number of Chinese retail sites (see also Choies, ChicWish, etc), all of which manufacture very low-cost fashion items, some of which are startlingly similar to clothing found in our favourite high street stores. (And which possibly ARE the same items we buy from the likes of Zara, Topshop etc, just with a different label sewn inside: who knows.)

Of these sites, RoseGal markets itself as catering to the “vintage inspired” market, and carries a lot of 50s-style dresses, one of which is this Dolce & Gabbana dupe. It’s identical in style, although the fact that it costs just $32 (and that’s WITH shipping from China) makes us very much doubt whether it’ll be of a similar quality. With that said, although we haven’t, as we mentioned, shopped from RoseGal before, we have bought or been sent items from both Choies and ChicWish, and while the quality wasn’t outstanding, it wasn’t terrible either, so you never know. Unless, of course, you decide to order this dress, and report back to us.

Would you, though? How do you feel about made-in-China dupes of designer clothing? Would you purchase one of these dresses?

[Thanks to Claudia for the report!]

4 Comments

  • March 27, 2014

    Sharon

    Very clever. No way to enforce the product protection laws. That said, I have looked at several of the Chinese sites. They are all over now. Some really stylish and lovely clothes. But a couple of problems. They frequently state that they run on the small side. Make sure to check the measurement charts. Also check for fine print on customs charges. Frequently there are none. However, I ordered jewelry supplies from a Chinese house that came with hefty customs fees and in one case, never received the goods at all. Usually somewhere in the fine print you will find a statement if you are responsible for customs charges. Check the customer comments. Frequently you will find someone purchased according to the size charts and the item was still too small. Delivery time is very slow by our standards, yet they are coming across the world. The one shipment I did receive took a month and a half. There are also some burgeoning Korean sites. Amazon has some of these as well as does ETSY. Always check the buyer statement to find place of origin. How I decide is from all of these factors and whether I can stand to gamble the amount I spent. According to the customer statements on Amazon, returns are almost impossible. Some are better than others. I guess it is a case of “buyer beware” but then, these are beautiful clothes we don’t see in our own stores, even here in the US.

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  • March 27, 2014

    Heidi

    I guess a fundamental question is who is the worse thief. The dress itself is nothing new or particularly imaginative. It’s a style of dress I made several of in high school in the middle of the last century! The only trick it displays, which isn’t much of one, is using a border print and cutting the top and bottom so the borders meet at the waist. Any girl who made her own clothes did things like this. So, who is the worse thief? The D&G version is about $2K — highway robbery at its best. The Chinese copy is about the right price but copies the D&G “verbatim.” Perhaps D&G and RoseGal used the same sweatshop to manufacture the dress and they are indeed the same dress. I find the D&G crime more agregious.

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  • March 27, 2014

    Claire

    I’ve bought from these Chinese/Korean wholesalers before and overall I’ve been happy with what I’ve gotten. They usually have clothes in styles you’d never find in American stores. Because I’m quite tall and broad even by American standards and because they do tend to run small, it’s pretty difficult for me to find things that fit, but when I do I love them. It’s true that they’re not very long-lasting or well-made clothes.

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  • June 7, 2014

    Jenny

    I just got my shipment of clothes I bought from Rosegal yesterday. Their clothes are similar to the ones shown in the picture posted on their website, but definitely lacks quality. My daughter both fit into the sizes I ordered because I knew their sizes ran small. Just keep in mind their sizes are like 1 size smaller than the junior department sizes here in the U.S. Asian women are mostly very petite. Prices are pretty cheap, but I would shop at similar type stores here instead in the future.

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