Fashion News: John Galliano found guilty of making racist remarks

John Galliano has bene found guilty of making racist and antisemitic remarksA Paris court has found John Galliano guilty of making racists remarks and hurling antisemitic abuse at members of the public in a Paris bar this February.

The designer, who claims not to remember the incidents, was given a suspended fine of €6,000: he was also ordered to pay €16,500 in court fees, as well as a symbolic euro to each of his targets, and to five anti-racism groups.

So, what now for Galliano? He’s already been sacked by Dior: can his career ever recover, or does his personal life and behaviour have no bearing on his standing as a fashion designer?

 

7 Comments

  • September 8, 2011

    Aaron via Facebook

    oh no! 😛

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  • September 8, 2011

    Nell

    Whilst I absolutely abhor what JG did, I do believe that his designs are fabulous. What he did does fill me with mixed feelings, because on the one hand, I love his designs, but on the other, I can’t overlook racism. You ask a difficult question here, I think it goes beyond fashion and towards ethics…

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  • September 9, 2011

    Julie

    Racism is heinous, regardless. However, he does have the right to make a living (he’s probably set for life though). I’ve seen other celebs do much worse things such as be suspicious of murder, rape, shoplifting, drug use, etc and get sympathy from the high-fashion and Hollywood communities. My main sadness with him is that in his line of work, surely he has worked with and been friendly with Jewish people and surely knows that they should not be objects of his hate. My hope is that he sees them now as the same as himself–just another human being.

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  • September 9, 2011

    Zoe

    I’m not sure, ask Mel Gibson and Charlie Sheen.

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  • September 9, 2011

    bookmole

    A person is the sum of their parts. He may be a great designer, but he now appears as a crap human being.

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  • September 9, 2011

    Tali

    Some people can say – oh well, he did what he did but he’s a great designer. Let’s give him another chance. Look at other people who did much worse things.
    Well, being a Jew and having participated in a Holocaust Remembrance day in Israel every year, I can say – some things can erase certain people for me.
    (btw my mom still asks me not to wear my Star of David necklace in public places. I still do)
    I think people who belong to groups that were a subject to racism at some point in history (or still are) will understand what I’m saying the best..
    And those who don’t, I guess they should just be happy about it..

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  • September 12, 2011

    Rachel Gray

    We would not put up with a public figure’s explicit rantings about Black people. It would simply not be tolerated. It’s called ‘hate speech,’ and it trespasses the boundaries of free speech (legally, ethically, and morally), and most especially from a public figure. There is a higher standard of conduct for public figures, like it or not. We expect more from police officers and celebrities: if we did not, we would not build an entire media industry around their (mis)conduct. Think about the difference: Nobody cares if Nordstrom’s assistant to the assistant manager for dinnerware goes to a bar and spouts off.
    Why must the public and the press turn around and admonish Jewish people that they are violating ‘free speech’ for objecting?

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