Daylight Robbery? Balmain cotton t-shirt with safety pins

Folks, do us a favour: read the title of this post again. Then explain to us why this cotton t-shirt is worth $1,500. WITHOUT using any variation on the phrase “Because IT’S OMGDESIGNER!”

We’ll wait here while you come up with something.

(Want it? Click here to buy it.)

14 Comments

  • April 14, 2011

    Serinde

    The cotton is egyptian, grown from seeds found in a 6th century B.C. tomb whic have been careful propegated in clean greenhouses, gaurded by 24hour/365day military survielance and a dedicated satellite in geostationary orbit. It was hand picked by the four remaining decendants of Edward the Confessor, and sewn by fairies. The Safty pins are individually carved from agate. easy. it’s quite cheep when you think about it…

    View Comment
  • April 14, 2011

    Rebecca

    It’s simple: That t-shirt enables you to fly and grants your every wish if only you clap your hands three times while wearing it.
    Oh, and it was woven by mermaids and when you take all the safety pins out and put them in a line, small letters and numbers magically appear that spell out the coordinates of the lost city of Atlantis (you’ll be happy to know that though all citizens are dead, they left quite a lot of priceless treasure behind. The holes came from griffin claws and poking your finger in the smallest of them enables you to speak to God.

    Now if you want an answer to your question that actually MAKES SENSE and isn’t most likely a total lie, well, I’m afraid I can’t help you there. And Serinde’s answer is actually more logical. But, oh well. Hope that helps!

    View Comment
    • April 14, 2011

      Sonya

      If this was true, I’d be more than happy to buy it. But I’m wearing something underneath. I’d prefer not to be arrested for indecency, thank you.

      View Comment
  • April 14, 2011

    kathlene

    it is obvious that this shirt transports you to an alternate unicorn reality, where you can find tons of glitter, either that or it transports you to the wizerding world tralala

    View Comment
  • April 14, 2011

    Tali

    Oops, they did it again.. (remember the green one with a hole on the boob?)

    View Comment
  • April 14, 2011

    Amee

    I’d just like to say-I like it. I have a fishnet shirt covered in safety pins as well. However, I didn’t buy it.
    It is worth that because wearing it will allow the wearer to solve global warming, bring about world peace, cure Rabies, AIDS, and everyone gets a free kitten.

    View Comment
    • April 14, 2011

      Rebecca

      That’s cool, not to mention actually productive. But……… what if I’d rather have a free ice cream cone? 😀

      View Comment
      • April 14, 2011

        Amee

        Kitten made out of an ice cream cone?

        View Comment
  • April 14, 2011

    lizvocal

    You all missed the point completely. Obviously, the T is a time machine that transports the wearer back to 1985, when she was *fabulous*.

    View Comment
  • April 14, 2011

    Pink Princess

    Imagine that safety pins were “revolutionary” back in the middle of the ’80s…
    Today it’s highway robbery!

    View Comment
  • April 14, 2011

    Jeepster

    Yeah my boot broke a few months ago so instead of buying new boots I just safety-pinned the zipper closure together…my friend thought it was just part of the boot!

    But yeah, if you want safety pins in your shirt why not just do it yourself? If you’re going for the DIY-punk look anyway wouldn’t it just be better?

    View Comment
  • April 16, 2011

    helen

    This looks like the type of shirt my friends and I would make ourselves and wear…in high school

    View Comment
  • April 19, 2011

    Deb

    Simple…it was dyed red with JC’s blood

    View Comment
  • April 20, 2011

    MM

    I, too, wore shirts like this in high school. Bought a $2 tee from the Salvation Army, ripped it up, pinned it together, paired it with my brother’s hiking books and Kool-Aid blue hair and felt EDGY AS HELL.

    There is something hilarious about upscale designers appropriating what ‘rebellious’ teenagers have been wearing for years.

    View Comment